Basilicon doron, 1599.
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Basilicon doron, 1599. by James I King of England

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Published by Scolar P. in Menston .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Education of princes -- Early works to 1800.,
  • Kings and rulers -- Duties.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Facsimile reprint of 1st ed., Edinburgh, 1599.

GenreEarly works to 1800.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsJC393.B3 J3 1599a
The Physical Object
Pagination[13], 3-159 p.
Number of Pages159
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL5273663M
ISBN 100854170340
LC Control Number75424141

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Description. This book’s title, Basilikon Doron, is a Greek phrase meaning ‘The King’s Gift’.Here that gift takes the form of a letter from King James to his ‘dearest’ son Henry (–). James draws on his own experience as a king to offer fatherly advice on how to be an effective ruler. Some notes: Basilicon Doron is actually composed of three short books. The following is the first book. The scripture references found in brackets [] also come from Basilicon Doron and are found in the margins next to the applicable text. This "First Booke" of Basilicon Doron contains excellent Christian advice from the King. Basilikon Doron or His Majesty’s Instructions to his dearest son, Henry the Prince Written by King James I Edition of Edinburgh, The Dedication of the Book Sonnet Lo here (my son) a mirror view and fair Which showeth the shadow of a worthy King. Lo here a Book, a pattern doth you bring Which ye should press to follow more and more.   Basilikon doron, or, King James's instructions to his dearest sonne, Henry the Prince, now reprinted, by His Majesties command () [James I, King of England] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Basilikon doron, or, King James's instructions to his dearest sonne, Henry the Prince, now reprintedReviews: 5.

Description. In , King James VI of Scotland published Basilikon Doron (The King’s Gift), a letter to his young son Henry (–), drawing on his own experience as king to offer advice on how to be an effective collection item is King James’s own autograph manuscript of the text – written in Middle Scots and complete with his revisions and corrections – in its. Materials for the Construction of Shakespeare's Morals, the Stoic Legacy to the Renaissance Major Ethical Authorities. Indexed According to Virtues, Vices, and Characters from the Plays, as well as Topics in Swift, Pope, and Wordsworth. Books: Cicero's De Officiis, Seneca's Moral Essays and Moral Epistles, Plutarch's Lives, Montaigne's Essays, Elyot's Governour, Spenser's Faerie Queene, James. Buy a cheap copy of Basilicon doron book by James VI & I. Free shipping over $ Buy a cheap copy of Basilicon doron book by James VI & I. Free shipping over $ Skip to content. All Categories. Kid's. Young Adult. Fiction. Collectibles. Offers. Our App. Blog. About Us. ISBN: ISBN Basilikon Doron or His Maiesties. Other articles where Basilikon Doron is discussed: James I: of Free Monarchies () and Basilikon Doron (), in which he expounded his own views on the divine right of kings. The edition of The Political Works of James I was edited by Charles Howard McIlwain (). The Poems of James VI of Scotland (2 vol.) was edited by.

James I, Basilikon Doron (selections) The Basilikon Doron is a richly important document for the role it plays in defining the Jacobean court and its use of domestic metaphor for describing regal power and responsibility. In addition, this treatise is a useful reminder of how James I viewed his relationship with his family and his subjects, both of whom are directed to view James I as their. Define basilicon. basilicon synonyms, basilicon pronunciation, basilicon translation, English dictionary definition of basilicon. n any of a variety of healing ointments applied to wounds in early medicine, commonly using lard or oil, resin, and wax. Full text of "Basilikon dōron [romanized]; or, His majestys Instructions to his dearest sonne, Henry the Prince" See other formats. Basilicon Doron by King James VI & I. 14 (cont.) Now, as to Faith which is the intertayner & quickner of Religion (as I have else said) It is a sure persuasion and apprehension of the promises of God, applying them to your soule: and therefore may it justlie be called, The golden chaine that linketh the faithful soule to Christ: And because it.